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dc.contributor.authorBaldwin, Sophie
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-02T12:43:54Z
dc.date.available2015-07-02T12:43:54Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/6987
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Cardiovascular disease is the most prevalent non-communicable disease worldwide. Hypertension, resting blood pressure >140mmHg, is a risk factor for CVD morbidity and mortality. Exercise has been proven to lower BP both acutely and chronically. There is an acute reduction in blood pressure post-exercise; this is termed Post-Exercise Hypotension (PEH). Previous research has used heat, as an additional stressor post-exercise, to exaggerate these altered blood pressure responses as treatment for elevated BP. Methods: The aim of this study was to identify whether recovery post exercise in a hot environment (29oC) significantly altered PEH compared to that in a warm environment (24oC). This was investigated using a HIT exercise protocol (4x4 minute at 85% VO2max, with 3 minutes recovery at 50% VO2max), followed by 50 minutes passive recovery in the hot or warm ambient temperature. Results: 5 males and 5 females (n=10) took part in the study (Age: 20± 1 years, Mass: 76.3± 12.4 kg, Height: 172.6± 7.5 cm) Blood pressure was recorded every 10 minutes over a 50-minute recovery period. There were no significant differences in core body temperature, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure between the two environmental conditions (p>0.05). Conclusion: Recovery in a 24oC and 29oC environmental condition does not alter blood pressure responses post-exercise.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.titleHow Does Recovery in 24°C and 29°C Ambient Temperatures Effect Post-Exercise Hypotension?en_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US


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