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dc.contributor.authorThornton, Jakob
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T11:08:00Z
dc.date.available2015-07-28T11:08:00Z
dc.date.issued2013-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/7094
dc.description.abstractInformed by interpretivist and interactionist perspectives, this research on Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a heart condition, examines cultural narratives of the disorder, as well the personal narratives of elite athletes. Taking a narrative approach, two types of stories are used as the primary source of data. Firstly, by analysing news articles that report stories of athletes with undiagnosed HCM, who have collapsed and/or died, cultural narratives of the condition were identified. Secondly, interviews with elite athletes explored their lived experiences, and how they respond to, and internalise the stories of HCM. Findings support previous research that argues athletes are likely to construct a disciplined body as part of their identity and lives in sport and that, subsequently, the restitution narrative is idealised in illness stories. Furthermore, this research proposes a dominant cultural narrative of HCM in sport: The shock narrative. The shock narrative challenges the control athletes have over their bodies and highlights the body‟s contingency. There is evidence to suggest that athletes may respond differently to, and have different levels of association with HCM depending on the sport that they play.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectHypertrophic cardiomyopathyen_US
dc.subjectnarrative approachen_US
dc.subjectthe bodyen_US
dc.subjectdisciplined bodyen_US
dc.subjectrestitutionen_US
dc.subjectshocken_US
dc.titleUNDERSTANDING HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY IN SPORT: A NARRATIVE APPROACHen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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