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dc.contributor.authorJassim, Shivan
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T11:51:23Z
dc.date.available2015-07-28T11:51:23Z
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/7101
dc.description.abstractObjectives The objectives of this study are to quantify the rates of return to athletic activity following lower limb joint arthroplasty and understand qualitative reasons for changes in activity participation. Design A retrospective questionnaire study. Setting A single centre, single surgeon patient cohort involving postal questionnaires. Participants Patients that had received either a knee or hip replacement under the age of 60 years, with an American Society of Anaesthesiologists grade of 1 or 2 and were a minimum of two years post-surgery Main outcome measures Validated joint-specific, activity and lifestyle questionnaires – Oxford Hip/Knee Scores (OHS, OKS), Short Form-12 (SF-12) scores, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) activity score and an activity questionnaire to assess satisfaction with joint replacements and the ability to participate in athletic activity following surgery with any reasons for non-participation in activity. Results 64 patients completed the questionnaires. The mean two-year scores were 40.7 for the OHS, 41.7 for the OKS, 46.2 for the SF-12 (physical), 54.2 for the SF-12 (mental) and 7.69 for the UCLA score. All patients returned to some form of athletic activity. All patients were either ‘satisfied’ or ‘highly 4 satisfied’ with their joint replacement and were able to perform their favoured athletic activity better than prior to surgery. The most common reasons for a change in activity participation were not wanting to stress their new joint replacement or because of instructions given by other doctors and the lead surgeon. There were no differences in the responses bases on the type of joint replacement the patient had received. Conclusions Patients receiving a joint replacement are able to participate in athletic activity to high levels and are satisfied with their outcomes. Patients hold the ability to participate in sport after surgery in high regard. The most common sports to continue with are golf, running and gym work. The most common reasons for non-participation in athletic activity post-surgery are based on patients’ own preferences and doctor/surgeon instruction.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectJoint replacementen_US
dc.subjectAthletic activityen_US
dc.subjectSporten_US
dc.subjectOutcomesen_US
dc.titleRETURN TO SPORT AFTER LOWER LIMB ARTHROPLASTY – WHY NOT FOR ALL?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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