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dc.contributor.authorGedzielewski, Kate
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T16:32:40Z
dc.date.available2015-07-28T16:32:40Z
dc.date.issued2012-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/7126
dc.description.abstractAs people age, they naturally become vulnerable to physical, mental and functional changes to their body. Elderly adults are susceptible to illnesses and diseases such as arthritis, falls and dementia (Hamburg and Clair, 2003; Fox et al., 2007; Norman, 2010), which can negatively affect their quality of life and their ability to carry out everyday tasks and activities. Many elderly people will move into care homes for support in daily living. However, it is important not to forget the importance of physical activity at this age, as this can be where the most benefits can be gained by sedentary people. Physical activity has been shown to be beneficial in many ways by improving balance, muscular strength and self-confidence which results in a greater ability to fulfil daily activities independently (Finch, 1997). The American College of Sports Medicine (2007) recommends that the elderly population take part in strength, balance and aerobic training, and it has been found that being physically active at this age can have great results.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectcare homesen_US
dc.subjectelderlyen_US
dc.subjectphysical activityen_US
dc.titleDo attitudes differ between care home managers in regards to incorporating physical activity opportunities into elderly residents’ daily lives, between care homes that receive funding and those that do not?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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