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dc.contributor.authorDavies, Dan
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-22T14:48:12Z
dc.date.available2015-10-22T14:48:12Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationDavies, D. (2015) 'The ‘iron gate’: high-stakes assessment at age 16 in Nepal and England', Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Educationen_US
dc.identifier.issn0305-7925
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/7258
dc.description.abstractIn Nepal, the School Leaving Certificate (SLC) assessment taken by 16-year-olds at the end of Grade 10 of formal schooling performs a similar function to the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) examination in England in that it summarises individual, school, district and national achievement and acts as a filtering mechanism to the final stage of schooling and, ultimately, higher education and the jobs market. Both the SLC and GCSE examinations have come under criticism in recent years, with some comparable issues arising, for example: (1) differences in success rates between pupils in different socioeconomic circumstances, types of school, genders and ethnic groups; (2) the role of teacher-assessed coursework and associated accusations of bias; and (3) the extent to which examination questions test recall, comprehension or application. Based upon interviews with students, teachers, academics and senior civil servants in Nepal, this paper draws comparisons between the two systems.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCompare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education;
dc.subjectadolescent schoolingen_US
dc.subjectsecondary educationen_US
dc.subjectcase studyen_US
dc.subjectNepalen_US
dc.titleThe ‘iron gate’: high-stakes assessment at age 16 in Nepal and Englanden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2015.1030591


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