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dc.contributor.authorAl Mortadi, Noor
dc.contributor.authorJones, Quentin
dc.contributor.authorEggbeer, Dominic
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Jeff
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Robert J.
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-12T15:24:37Z
dc.date.available2015-11-12T15:24:37Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationAl Mortadi, N., Jones, Q., Eggbeer, D., Lewis, J. & Williams, R.J. (2015) "Fabrication of a resin appliance with alloy components using digital technology without an analog impression", American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, 148(5), pp.862-867.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/7300
dc.descriptionThis article was published in American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics on 01 November 2015 (online), available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajodo.2015.06.014.
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to fabricate a resin appliance incorporating “wire” components without the use of an analog impression and dental casts using an intraoral scanner and computer technology to build the appliance. This unique alignment of technology offers an enormous reduction in the number of fabrication steps when compared with more traditional methods of manufacture. The prototype incorporated 2 Adams clasps and a fitted labial bow. The alloy components were built from cobalt-chromium in an initial powdered form using established digital technology methods and then inserted into a build of a resin base plate. This article reports the first known use of computer-aided design and additive manufacture to fabricate a resin and alloy appliance, and constitutes proof of the concept for such manufacturing. The original workflow described could be seen as an example for many other similar appliances, perhaps with active components. The scan data were imported into an appropriate specialized computer-aided design software, which was used in conjunction with a force feedback (haptic) interface. The appliance designs were then exported as stereolithography files and transferred to an additive manufacturing machine for fabrication. The results showed that the applied techniques may provide new manufacturing and design opportunities in orthodontics and highlights the need for intraoral-specific additive manufacture materials to be produced and tested for biocompatibility compliance. In a trial, the retainer was fitted orally and judged acceptable by the clinician according to the typical criteria when placing such appliances in situ.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier Masson
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0) License
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.titleFabrication of a resin appliance with alloy components using digital technology without an analog impression
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajodo.2015.06.014
dc.rights.embargodate2016-11-01
dc.rights.embargoreason12 month embargo specified by publisher
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2016-11-01


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Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0) License
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0) License