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dc.contributor.authorBarham, Gareth
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-13T17:02:14Z
dc.date.available2016-01-13T17:02:14Z
dc.date.issued2005-11
dc.identifier.citationHarvarden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/7489
dc.description.abstractIssues of user accessibility and usability of technological products such as mobile phones, personal digital assistants and MP3 players influence the adoption of such Digital Information Appliances by the majority of users today. The MP3 player typifies the breadth of variety available to the consumer. They are mostly technologically similar in that they are able to hold vast numbers of tracks. They differ only in size and interface design. That is to say, the user experience of each make will be greatly different. Pioneers of MP3 technology were simply interested in driving the technology. Products such as Creative Technology’s Nomad II were technologically superior to any other personal mobile music player available at that time, but lacked any real understanding of user needs. Conversley, despite being amongst the last to enter the market, the Apple iPod became an instant success because it did address its users’ needs. First Apple assessed user needs; they then designed a product that addressed those needs and they also created a successful business model with all of the benefits of iTunes.en_US
dc.publisherNational Centre for Product Design and Development Research (PDR)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSchool of Product & Engineering Design, UWIC. PED & PDR Symposium on Product & Engineering Design,;
dc.subjectMulti-function buttonsen_US
dc.subjectMenu-Screenen_US
dc.subjectControl-Input Deviceen_US
dc.subjectDigital Information Appliancesen_US
dc.titleHUMAN ORIENTATED PRODUCT INTERFACESen_US
dc.typeConference proceedingsen_US


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