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dc.contributor.authorBailey, Jake
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-14T09:53:35Z
dc.date.available2016-01-14T09:53:35Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/7493
dc.descriptionMSc Sport and Exercise Scienceen_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the biomechanical variables that underpin the performance of foot jumping on the trampoline. It also attempted to evaluate the technique(s) used by elite male trampoline gymnasts when foot jumping on the trampoline, with specific reference to changes that occurred as a function of jump height. The last five jumps prior to the commencement of a competition routine were recorded for four participants, who were all international male trampoline gymnasts. Inertia parameter data was also taken, facilitating the calculation of kinetic, as well as kinematic, variables from the digitised film. Variables analysed included centre of mass (CM) vertical displacements and velocities, CM vertical displacements relative to the bed, net vertical forces, work done by the performer, segmental contributions to work done, and joint angles and angular velocities at the ankle knee and hip. A flexed body position at first contact (FC) with the bed, and the participants' capacity to do work during the contact phase were the factors considered to influence the centre of mass (CM) vertical velocity at last contact (LC). The jump height and the forcedisplacement characteristics of the bed exerted influence on the participants' capacity to manipulate these two factors. Although it would have been mechanically beneficial for the participants to extend the body near maximum depression (MD) the large net vertical forces acting during this part of the contact phase meant that extension was generally attenuated near MD. The composite segments of both the lower extremity and the trunk-head both made important contributions to the work done. The techniques used during the contact phase to increase jump height showed some consistency, but were affected as jump height increased, predominantly due to the force-displacement characteristics of the bed.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Wales Institute Cardiff.en_US
dc.titleA biomechanical analysis of foot jumping on the trampoline.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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