Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHarris, Kerry
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-05T13:51:40Z
dc.date.available2009-02-05T13:51:40Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/758
dc.description.abstractSport is a competition between athletes to compare and measure athletic performance. The victory in contests ought to be brought about by legitimate athletic performance only. Legitimate athletic performance must exclude performance factors which are largely outside of the athlete’s control. Athletes are not responsible for the advantages gained through genetic enhancement so they deserve no merit or reward for victories brought about by such enhancements. The use of genetic technology is unfair and should be recognised as a form of cheating. To prohibit the use of genetic technology is a legitimate restriction of personal autonomy. This is because the widespread use of genetic technology poses risks to the athletes and harms to sport itself. Moreover if genetic technology was considered acceptable, athletes would be coerced into using it for themselves (somatic genetic modification) and/or parents might pursue germ-line genetic modification for their offspring. The later is a significant and troubling infringement of children’s rights.en_UK
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wales Institute Cardiffen
dc.subjectSport and PEen
dc.titleAn ethical critique of genetic enhancement in sporten
dc.typeThesis


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following collection(s)

Show simple item record