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dc.contributor.authorEvans, Ellen W.
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-15T16:25:31Z
dc.date.available2016-03-15T16:25:31Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-01
dc.identifier.citationEvans, E. W., & Redmond, E. C. (2015). 'Analysis of older adults' domestic kitchen storage practices in the United Kingdom: identification of risk factors associated with listeriosis', Journal of Food Protection, 78(4), pp. 738-745.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0362-028X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/7773
dc.descriptionThis article was published in Journal of Food Protection on 01 April 2015, available at http://dx.doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-14-527en_US
dc.descriptionClosed deposit
dc.description.abstractIncreased listeriosis incidence among older adults (≥60 years) has been reported internationally, with many cases reported to be sporadic and associated with ready-to-eat (RTE) food products with extended refrigerated shelf life. Given that the home kitchen is recognized as a significant location where foodborne illnesses are acquired, it is important that consumers implement safe food practices to minimize risks. This is crucial for vulnerable consumers, such as older adults. Consumer food safety recommendations in the United Kingdom to reduce the risk of listeriosis at home include (i) following “use-by” dates on unopened prepacked RTE food products, (ii) consuming RTE food products within 2 days of opening, and (iii) ensuring the safe operating temperatures of domestic refrigerators (≤5°C). This study utilized observation, self-reporting, and microbiological analysis to determine actual food storage practices to identify behavioral risk factors. A domestic kitchen survey was conducted in older adult (≥60 years) consumers' domestic kitchens (n = 100) in South Wales, United Kingdom. Forty-one percent of foods in home refrigerators were beyond the use-by date, of which 11% were unopened RTE food products commonly associated with listeriosis. Sixty-six percent of opened RTE foods had been or were intended to be stored beyond the recommended 2 days after opening. Older adults failed to ensure safe refrigeration temperatures, with 50% of central storage and 85% of door storage areas operating at temperatures >5°C. Older refrigerators operated at significantly (P < 0.05) higher temperatures. Given that Listeria monocytogenes was isolated in 2% of kitchens, these findings suggest that storage malpractices may have a greater effect on the potential risk of listeriosis than its presence alone. The study has determined that many older adults fail to adhere to recommendations and subject RTE foods associated with L. monocytogenes to prolonged storage at unsafe temperatures which may render food unsafe for consumption.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherInternational Association for Food Protectionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Food Protection
dc.subjectconsumer behaviouren_US
dc.subjectfood safetyen_US
dc.subjectdomestic kitchenen_US
dc.subjectlisteriosisen_US
dc.subjectolder adultsen_US
dc.subjectstorage practicesen_US
dc.subjectdomestic refrigeratorsen_US
dc.subjectobservationen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of older adults' domestic kitchen storage practices in the United Kingdom: identification of risk factors associated with listeriosisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-14-527
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-12-09
dc.refexceptionThe publication concerned actively disallows open-access deposit in a repository, and was the most appropriate publication for the output


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