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dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Rhodri S.
dc.contributor.authorRadnor, John M.
dc.contributor.authorDe Ste Croix, M. B. A.
dc.contributor.authorCronin, John B.
dc.contributor.authorOliver, Jon
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-08T10:53:23Z
dc.date.available2016-04-08T10:53:23Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationLloyd, R. S., J. M. Radnor, M. B. De Ste Croix, J. B. Cronin and J. L. Oliver (2016), 'Changes in sprint and jump performance following traditional, plyometric and combined resistance training in male youth pre- and post-peak height velocity', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 30 (5), pp. 1239-1247en_US
dc.identifier.issn1064-8011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/7848
dc.descriptionThis article in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research was available online ahead of print on 26 September 2015 at http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001216 The author's post-print is made available in this repository from 26 September 2016en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 6-week training interventions utilizing different modes of resistance (traditional strength, plyometric and combined training) on sprinting and jumping performance in boys pre- and post-peak height velocity (PHV). Eighty school-age boys were categorized into two maturity groups (pre- or post-PHV) and then randomly assigned to 1) plyometric training, 2) traditional strength training, 3) combined training, or 4) a control group. Experimental groups participated in twice-weekly training programmes for 6-weeks. Acceleration, maximal running velocity, squat jump height and reactive strength index data were collected pre- and post-intervention. All training groups made significant gains in measures of sprinting and jumping irrespective of the mode of resistance training and maturity. Plyometric training elicited the greatest gains across all performance variables in pre-PHV children, whereas combined training was the most effective in eliciting change in all performance variables for the post-PHV cohort. Statistical analysis indicated that plyometric training produced greater changes in squat jump and acceleration performance in the pre-PHV group compared to the post-PHV cohort. All other training responses between pre- and post-PHV cohorts were not significant and not clinically meaningful. The study indicates that plyometric training might be more effective in eliciting short-term gains in jumping and sprinting in boys that are pre-PHV, whereas those that are post-PHV may benefit from the additive stimulus of combined training.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkinsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
dc.subjectstrength trainingen_US
dc.subjectplyometric trainingen_US
dc.subjectcombined trainingen_US
dc.subjectchildrenen_US
dc.subjectadolescentsen_US
dc.titleChanges in sprint and jump performance following traditional, plyometric and combined resistance training in male youth pre- and post-peak height velocityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001216
dc.date.dateAccepted2015-09-17
dc.rights.embargodate2016-09-26
dc.rights.embargoreason12 month embargo requested by publisher


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