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dc.contributor.authorLo Iacono, Valeria
dc.contributor.authorBrown, David
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-09T13:45:00Z
dc.date.available2016-05-09T13:45:00Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationLo Iacono, Valeria, & Brown, David H. K. (2016) 'Beyond binarism: exploring a model of living cultural heritage for dance', Dance Research, The Journal of the Society for Dance Research, 34 (1), pp.84-105en_US
dc.identifier.issn0264-2875
dc.identifier.issn1750-0095
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3366/drs.2016.0147
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/7877
dc.descriptionThis article was published in Dance Research in May 2016 (online), available at http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/drs.2016.0147en_US
dc.description.abstractThis essay, inspired by the 2003 UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage, explores meanings and definitions of the term ‘cultural heritage’ as it may be applied to dance. UNESCO's effort to include many different types of human expressions in its lists is commendable and an important attempt to safeguard the aspects of the world's cultural heritage. However, the binary oppositions of ‘tangible’/’intangible’, frequently used to describe material and immaterial elements of culture and heritage create a false dichotomy. This label is particularly problematic for dance, given its complex, multi-dimensional nature in which intangible and tangible elements are indissolubly linked. Instead, we suggest an alternative perspective of ‘living cultural heritage’ which is informed by three post-dualist conceptions contained within Giddens' Structuration theory (structure-agency), Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology (mind-body) and Bourdieu's theory of cultural practice (field-practice-habitus). This essay introduces the idea of a living cultural heritage by using the above post-dualist concepts as a stepping stone towards a more inclusive and fluid model of heritage. In this model, the cultural, embodied, practical, spatial, temporal and artefactual elements of cultural heritage are retained as each contributes to an emergent process of exchange and dialogue resulting in cultural heritage.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherEdinburgh University Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDance Research
dc.subjectbodyen_US
dc.subjectdanceen_US
dc.subjectintangible cultural heritageen_US
dc.subjectdualityen_US
dc.subjectdualismen_US
dc.subjectUNESCOen_US
dc.titleBeyond Binarism: Exploring a Model of Living Cultural Heritage for Danceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3366/drs.2016.0147
dc.date.dateAccepted2015-12


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