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dc.contributor.authorMusoke, David
dc.contributor.authorKarani, George
dc.contributor.authorNdejjo, Rawlence
dc.contributor.authorOkui, Peter
dc.contributor.authorMusoke, Miph B
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-21T11:25:46Z
dc.date.available2016-07-21T11:25:46Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-07
dc.identifier.citationMusoke, D., Karani, G., Ndejjo, R., Okui, P. and Musoke, M.B. (2016) 'Experiences of households using integrated malaria prevention in two rural communities in Wakiso district, Uganda: a qualitative study', Malaria journal, 15(1), p.1.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1475-2875
dc.identifier.issn1475-2875 (ESSN)
dc.descriptionThis article was published in Malaria Journal on 07 June 2016 (online) available open access at http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12936-016-1369-4en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground The integrated approach to malaria prevention which advocates use of several methods in a holistic manner is being explored to complement existing strategies. A pilot project that promoted integrated malaria prevention established 40 demonstration households using the approach. As part of impact evaluation of the project 2 years after implementation, the experiences of these households using integrated malaria prevention were assessed. Methods A qualitative cross-sectional survey was carried out in Wakiso district, Uganda which involved 40 in-depth interviews among households implementing integrated malaria prevention. The study assessed practices on malaria prevention, benefits and challenges of using integrated malaria prevention, preference of malaria prevention methods, and impact of the demonstration households on the community. Thematic analysis was employed using Atlas ti software. Results The households continued to use many of the malaria prevention methods in the integrated approach including sleeping under long-lasting insecticidal nets, screening in windows and ventilators, removing mosquito breeding sites, and closing of doors early in the evenings. The major benefits reported from using integrated malaria prevention were reduction in mosquito populations in their houses and less occurrence of malaria particularly among children. Although several community members learnt about and admired various malaria prevention methods from the demonstration households especially screening in windows and ventilators, the majority could not afford to implement some of them due to lack of resources. The main challenge established in using integrated malaria prevention was the much time required to implement the several methods some of which had to be done regularly such as early closing of windows. In addition, complacency had led to some households not utilizing a number of methods in the integrated approach because of using others. Conclusion Use of the integrated approach to malaria prevention benefited the demonstration households mainly through observed reduction in mosquitoes indoors and malaria occurrence hence could be promoted in other areas. Other studies to quantify the protective effect of integrated malaria prevention particularly regarding malaria prevalence and contribution of each of the methods are required.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMalaria Journal
dc.subjectMalaria preventionen_US
dc.subjectintegrated approachen_US
dc.subjectlong-lasting insecticidal netsen_US
dc.subjectwindow and ventilator screeningen_US
dc.subjectmosquito breeding sitesen_US
dc.subjectUgandaen_US
dc.titleExperiences of households using integrated malaria prevention in two rural communities in Wakiso district, Uganda: a qualitative studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12936-016-1369-4
dc.date.dateAccepted2016-06-02


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