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dc.contributor.authorLlewellyn-Matthews, James
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-23T08:59:22Z
dc.date.available2016-09-23T08:59:22Z
dc.date.issued2016-03-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/8053
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to gain knowledge about the effect of coping strategies on a non-elite athlete’s adherence to the rehabilitation process. Injured non-elite athletes [n=5] who were unable to play sport for at least four to six weeks participated in this study. Three semi-structured interviews took place at injury onset, mid-point of rehabilitation and at the return to sport phase to gain insight into the coping strategies employed by them and their impact on adherence. The study found that each participant employed coping strategies throughout each phase of the rehabilitation process which helped facilitate adherence. These strategies included social support, self-talk, imagery and goal setting. Each participant used the coping strategy that they as individuals believed was key to help them through each stage of the rehabilitation process. This study concludes that coping strategies can have a significant influence on the adherence levels of the injured non-elite athlete to their rehabilitation programme in line with Wiese-Bjornstal et al’s (1998) model.en_US
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.titleThe effect of coping strategies on non-elite athlete's adherence to the rehabilitation processen_US
dc.title.alternativeSport and Exercise Scienceen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US


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