Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBaldwin, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorBurleigh, Alistair
dc.contributor.authorPepperell, Robert
dc.contributor.authorRuta, Nicole
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-08T21:49:34Z
dc.date.available2016-11-08T21:49:34Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-17
dc.identifier.citationBaldwin, J., Burleigh, A., Pepperell, R. and Ruta, N. (2016) 'The Perceived Size and Shape of Objects in Peripheral Vision', i-Perception, 7 (4), pp. 1-23.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/8138
dc.descriptionThis article was published in i-Perception on 17th August 2016 (online), available open access at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2041669516661900en_US
dc.description.abstractLittle is known about how we perceive the size and shape of objects in far peripheral vision. Observations made during an artistic study of visual space suggest that objects appear smaller and compressed in the periphery compared with central vision. To test this, we conducted three experiments. In Experiment 1, we asked participants to draw how a set of peripheral discs appeared when viewed peripherally without time or eye movement constraints. In Experiment 2, we used the method of constant stimuli to measure when a briefly presented peripheral stimulus appeared bigger or smaller compared with a central fixated one. In Experiment 3, we measured how accurate participants were in discriminating shapes presented briefly in the periphery. In Experiment 1, the peripheral discs were reported as appearing significantly smaller than the central disc, and as having an elliptical or polygonal contour. In Experiment 2, participants judged the size of peripheral discs as being significantly smaller when compared with the central disc across most of the peripheral field, and in Experiment 3, participants were quite accurate in reporting the shape of the peripheral object, except in the far periphery. Our results show that objects in the visual periphery are perceived as diminished in size when presented for long and brief exposures, suggesting diminution is an intrinsic feature of the structure of the visual space. Shape distortions, however, are reported only with longer exposures.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSageen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesi-Perception;
dc.subjectperipheral visionen_US
dc.subjectsize perceptionen_US
dc.subjectshape perceptionen_US
dc.subjectvisual spaceen_US
dc.titleThe Perceived Size and Shape of Objects in Peripheral Visionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2041669516661900
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-06-21
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionVoRen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-11-08
dc.date.refFCD2016-11-08
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following collection(s)

  • Fovolab [42]
    Fovolab aspires to push the boundaries of understanding perceptual experience – how we perceive and are aware of the world.

Show simple item record