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dc.contributor.authorLewis, Jane E. A.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Paul
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Jane H.
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-14T12:44:02Z
dc.date.available2016-11-14T12:44:02Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-12
dc.identifier.citationLewis, E.A., Williams, P. and Davies, J.H. (2016) 'Non-invasive assessment of peripheral arterial disease: Automated ankle brachial index measurement and pulse volume analysis compared to duplex scan', SAGE Open Medicine, 4, p.2050312116659088.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2050-3121
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/8140
dc.descriptionThis article was published in Sage Open Medicine on 12 July 2016, available open access at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050312116659088en_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This cross-sectional study aimed to individually and cumulatively compare sensitivity and specificity of the (1) ankle brachial index and (2) pulse volume waveform analysis recorded by the same automated device, with the presence or absence of peripheral arterial disease being verified by ultrasound duplex scan. Methods: Patients (n=205) referred for lower limb arterial assessment underwent ankle brachial index measurement and pulse volume waveform recording using volume plethysmography, followed by ultrasound duplex scan. The presence of peripheral arterial disease was recorded if ankle brachial index <0.9; pulse volume waveform was graded as 2, 3 or 4; or if haemodynamically significant stenosis >50% was evident with ultrasound duplex scan. Outcome measure was agreement between the measured ankle brachial index and interpretation of pulse volume waveform for peripheral arterial disease diagnosis, using ultrasound duplex scan as the reference standard. Results: Sensitivity of ankle brachial index was 79%, specificity 91% and overall accuracy 88%. Pulse volume waveform sensitivity was 97%, specificity 81% and overall accuracy 85%. The combined sensitivity of ankle brachial index and pulse volume waveform was 100%, specificity 76% and overall accuracy 85%. Conclusion: Combining these two diagnostic modalities within one device provided a highly accurate method of ruling out peripheral arterial disease, which could be utilised in primary care to safely reduce unnecessary secondary care referrals.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSageen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSage Open Medicine;
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution License or Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License available:
dc.subjectautomated ankle brachial indexen_US
dc.subjectpulse volumeen_US
dc.subjectpulse volume waveformen_US
dc.subjectultrasound duplex scanen_US
dc.subjectperipheral arterial diseaseen_US
dc.subjectlower limben_US
dc.titleNon-invasive assessment of peripheral arterial disease: Automated ankle brachial index measurement and pulse volume analysis compared to duplex scanen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050312116659088
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-06-14
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionVoRen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-11-14
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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