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dc.contributor.authorMayr, Robert
dc.contributor.authorSiddika, Aysha
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-18T13:21:23Z
dc.date.available2016-11-18T13:21:23Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-16
dc.identifier.citationMayr, R. & Siddika, A. (2016) 'Inter-generational transmission in a minority language setting: Stop consonant production by Bangladeshi heritage children and adults', International Journal of Bilingualism, DOI: 10.1177/1367006916672590en_US
dc.identifier.issn1367-0069
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/8159
dc.descriptionThis article was published in International Journal of Bilingualism on 16 October 2016 (online), available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1367006916672590en_US
dc.description.abstractAims and objectives: The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of speech development across successive generations of heritage language users, examining how cross-linguistic, developmental and socio-cultural factors affect stop consonant production. Design: To this end, we recorded Sylheti and English stop productions of two sets of Bangladeshi heritage families: (1) first-generation adult migrants from Bangladesh and their (second-generation) UK-born children, and (2) second-generation UK-born adult heritage language users and their (third-generation) UK-born children. Data and analysis: The data were analysed auditorily, using whole-word transcription, and acoustically, examining voice onset time. Comparisons were then made in both languages across the four groups of participants, and cross-linguistically. Findings: The results revealed non-native productions of English stops by the first-generation migrants but largely target-like patterns by the remaining sets of participants. The Sylheti stops exhibited incremental changes across successive generations of speakers, with the third-generation children’s productions showing the greatest influence from English. Originality: This is one of few studies to examine both the host and heritage language in an ethnic minority setting, and the first to demonstrate substantial differences in heritage language accent between age-matched second- and third-generation children. The study shows that current theories of bilingual speech learning do not go far enough in explaining how speech develops in heritage language settings. Implications: These findings have important implications for the maintenance, transmission and long-term survival of heritage languages, and show that investigations need to go beyond second-generation speakers, in particular in communities that do not see a steady influx of new migrants.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSageen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInternational Journal of Bilingualism;
dc.subjectStop consonantsen_US
dc.subjectauditoryand acustic analysisen_US
dc.subjectheritage languageen_US
dc.subjectSylheti-English Bilingualismen_US
dc.subjectbilingual phonological acquisitionen_US
dc.titleInter-generational transmission in a minority language setting: Stop consonant production by Bangladeshi heritage children and adultsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1367006916672590
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-09-31
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-11-18
dc.refexceptionOA compliant
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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