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dc.contributor.authorExell, Timothy A.
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, Gareth
dc.contributor.authorGittoes, Marianne J.R.
dc.contributor.authorKerwin, David G.
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-15T08:48:36Z
dc.date.available2016-12-15T08:48:36Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-27
dc.identifier.citationExell, T., Irwin, G., Gittoes, M. and Kerwin, D. (2016) 'Strength and performance asymmetry during maximal velocity sprint running', Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports (in press)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/8263
dc.descriptionThis article was published in Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports on 27 September 2016 (online), available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sms.12759. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archivingen_US
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to empirically examine the interaction of athlete-specific kinematic kinetic and strength asymmetry in sprint running. Bilateral ground reaction force and kinematic data were collected during maximal velocity (mean = 9.05 m∙s-1) sprinting for eight athletes. Bilateral ground reaction force data were also collected whilst the same athletes performing maximal effort squat jumps. Using novel composite asymmetry scores, interactions between kinematic and kinetic asymmetry were compared for the group of sprinters. Asymmetry was greater for kinematic variables than step characteristics, with largest respective values of 6.68% and 1.68%. Kinetic variables contained the largest asymmetry values, peaking at >90%. Asymmetry was present in all kinematic and kinetic variables analysed during sprint trials. However, individual athlete asymmetry profiles were reported for sprint and jump trials. Athletes’ sprint performance was not related to their overall asymmetry. Positive relationships were found between asymmetry in ankle work during sprint running and peak vertical force (r = 0.895) and power (r = 0.761) during jump trials, suggesting that the ankle joint may be key in regulating asymmetry in sprinting and the individual nature of asymmetry. The individual athlete asymmetry profiles and lack of relationship between asymmetry of limb strength and sprint performance suggest that athletes are not ‘limb dominant’ and that strength imbalances are joint and task specific. Compensatory kinetic mechanisms may serve to reduce the effects of strength or biological asymmetry on the performance outcome of step velocity.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesScandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports;
dc.subjectgait, sprinting, symmetry angle, strength asymmetryen_US
dc.titleStrength and Performance Asymmetry During Maximal Velocity Sprint Runningen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sms.12759
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-08-10
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-12-15
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2017-09-27


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