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dc.contributor.authorMoore, Isabel
dc.contributor.authorMount, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorMathema, Prabhat
dc.contributor.authorRanson, Craig
dc.contributor.othercmet = Isabel Moore, Craig Ranson
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-09T08:20:39Z
dc.date.available2017-03-09T08:20:39Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-01
dc.identifier.citationMoore, I.S., Mount, S., Mathema, P., and Ranson, C. (2017) 'Application of the subsequent injury categorisation model for longitudinal injury surveillance in elite rugby and cricket: intersport comparisons and inter-rater reliability of coding', British Journal of Sports Medicine. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2016-097040
dc.identifier.issn1473-0480
dc.identifier.issn0306-3674
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/8380
dc.description.abstractBackground: When an athlete has more than one injury over a time period it is important to determine if these are related to each other or not. The subsequent injury categorisation (SIC) model is a method designed to consider the relationship between an index injury and subsequent injury(ies). Objective: The primary aim was to apply SIC to longitudinal injury data from two team sports: rugby union and cricket. The secondary aim was to determine SIC inter-rater reliability. Methods: Rugby union (time-loss; TL) and cricket (TL and non time-loss; NTL) injuries sustained between 2011-2014 within one international team respectively, were recorded using international consensus methods. SIC was applied by multiple raters; team clinicians, non-team clinicians, and a sports scientist. Weighted kappa and Cohen’s kappa scores were calculated for inter-rater reliability of the rugby union TL injuries and cricket NTL and TL injuries. Results: 67% and 51% of the subsequent injuries in rugby union and cricket respectively were categorised as injuries to a different body part not related to an index injury (SIC code 10). At least moderate agreement (weighted and Cohen kappa ≥ 0.60) was observed for team clinicians and the non-team clinician for both sports. Including NTL and TL injuries increased agreement between team clinician and non-team clinician, but not between clinician and sport scientist. Conclusion: The most common subsequent injury in both sports was an injury to a different body part that was not related to an index injury. The SIC model was generally reliable, with the highest agreement between clinicians working within the same team. Recommendations for future use of SIC are provided based on the proximity of the rater to the team and the raters’ level of clinical knowledge.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWelsh Rugby Unionen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBritish Journal of Sports Medicine;
dc.subjectReliability, rugby, cricketen_US
dc.titleApplication of the Subsequent Injury Categorisation (SIC) model for longitudinal injury surveillance in elite rugby and cricket: Inter-sport comparisons and inter-rater reliability of codingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2016-097040
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-01-12
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-03-09
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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