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dc.contributor.authorCullen, Tom
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorWebb, Richard
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Thom
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Michael G.
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-23T16:57:59Z
dc.date.available2017-03-23T16:57:59Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-17
dc.identifier.citationCullen, T., Thomas, A.W., Webb, R., Phillips, T. and Hughes, M.G. (2017) 'sIL-6R is related to weekly training mileage and psychological well-being in athletes', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 49 (6), pp.1176–1183en_US
dc.identifier.issn0195-9131
dc.identifier.issn1530-0315
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/8405
dc.identifier.urihttps://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Fulltext/2017/06000/sIL_6R_Is_Related_to_Weekly_Training_Mileage_and.14.aspx
dc.descriptionThis article was published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise on 19 January 2017 (online ahead of print), available open access at https://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Fulltext/2017/06000/sIL_6R_Is_Related_to_Weekly_Training_Mileage_and.14.aspxen_US
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: IL-6 has been ascribed both positive and negative roles in the context of exercise and training. The dichotomous nature of IL-6 signalling appears to be determined by the respective concentration of its receptors (both membrane-bound (IL-6R) and soluble (sIL-6R) forms). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the response of sIL-6R to long-term training, and to investigate the relationship between sIL-6R, self-reported measures of wellbeing, and upper respiratory illness symptoms (URS) in highly-trained endurance athletes. METHODS: Twenty-nine athletes provided resting blood samples, and completed wellbeing and illness monitoring questionnaires, on a weekly basis for a period of 18 weeks during a winter training block. RESULTS: URS were not correlated to concentrations of sIL-6R or cortisol, but there was a non-significant trend (P=0.08) for the most illness-prone athletes (as defined by self-reported illness questionnaire data) to exhibit higher average sIL-6R concentrations compared to the least ill (23.7±4.3 Vs 20.1±3.8 ng/ml). Concentrations of sIL-6R were positively correlated to subjective measures of stress (r=0.64, P=0.004) and mood (r=0.49, P=0.02), but were negatively correlated to sleep quality (r=-0.43, P=0.05) and cortisol concentration (r=-0.17, P=0.04). In a sub-group of 10 athletes, weekly training distance was quantified by coaching staff, and this negatively correlated with sIL-6R in the following week (r=-0.74, P<0.005). CONCLUSION: The findings of the current study suggest that sIL-6R is responsive to prolonged periods of exercise training, with sIL-6R levels varying related to the volume of training performed in the preceding week. Importantly, our data indicate that changes in sIL-6R levels could be linked to common symptoms of overreaching such as high levels of stress, and/or depressed mood.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherACSMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMedicine & Science in Sports & Exercise;
dc.titlesIL-6R is related to weekly training mileage and psychological wellbeing in athletesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000001210
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-01-09
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/under-embargo-all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-03-23
dc.refexceptionOA compliant
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2018-01-17
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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