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dc.contributor.authorChamberland, C.
dc.contributor.authorHodgetts, Helen M.
dc.contributor.authorVallières, Benoît R.
dc.contributor.authorVachon, François
dc.contributor.authorTremblay, Sébastien
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-09T12:39:40Z
dc.date.available2017-05-09T12:39:40Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-01
dc.identifier.citationChamberland, C., Hodgetts, H.M., Vallières, B.R., Vachon, F. and Tremblay, S. (2016) 'Pip and Pop: When Auditory Alarms Facilitate Visual Change Detection in Dynamic Settings', In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, 60,(1), pp. 284-288en_US
dc.identifier.issn1071-1813
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/8448
dc.descriptionThis paper was published in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting on 15 September (online), available at https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213601065en_US
dc.description.abstractDynamic and complex command and control situations often require the timely recognition of changes in the environment in order to detect potentially malicious actions. Change detection can be challenging within a continually evolving scene, and particularly under multitasking conditions whereby attention is necessarily divided between several subtasks. On-screen tools can assist with detection (e.g., providing a visual record of changes, ensuring that none are overlooked), however, in a high workload environment, this may result in information overload to the detriment of the primary task. One alternative is to exploit the auditory modality as a means to support visual change detection. In the current study, we use a naval air-warfare simulation, and introduce an auditory alarm to coincide with critical visual changes (in aircraft speed/direction) on the radar. We found that participants detected a greater percentage of visual changes and were significantly quicker to detect these changes when they were accompanied by an auditory alarm than when they were not. Furthermore, participants reported that mental demand was lower in the auditory alarm condition, and this was reflected in reduced classification omissions on the primary task. Results are discussed in relation to Wickens’ multiple resource theory of attention and indicate the potential for using the auditory modality to facilitate visual change detection.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSageen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting;
dc.titlePip and Pop: When auditory alarms facilitate visual change detection in dynamic settingsen_US
dc.typeConference proceedingsen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213601065
dcterms.dateAccepted2016
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-05-09
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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