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dc.contributor.authorGibbs, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-17T12:22:36Z
dc.date.available2009-11-17T12:22:36Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/856
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to measure and compare the anaerobic power and capacity of University male under 23 age group 100m (n = 8) and 400m (n = 7) county level sprint trained athletes using a standard Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT). The Test involved pedalling maximally on a cycle ergometer (Monark) for 30 seconds against a predetermined resistance relative to 7.5% of a subject‟s body mass. The protocol developed by Ayalon (1974) was used. An Independent T-test was employed to examine for statistical differences between the means of the measured parameters of both data sets. Results identified a significant difference between the Peak Power Output (P = 0.006) and Mean Power Output (P = 0.019) of both samples; both P values were less than the 95% level of confidence (P<0.05). However there was no statistical difference between the FI of both samples, (P = 0.077); this P value is greater than the 95% level of confidence (P>0.05). All 3 of the measured parameters were greater in the 100m sample than the 400m sample respectively; PPO = 991 ± 98 W and 819 ± 105 W; MPO = 750.20 ± 59.72 W and 657.23 W ± 75.01 and FI = 49 ± 8% and 40 ± 10%. The increased mean anaerobic power (PPO & MPO) of the 100m sample can be attributed to their increased body mass and specialism in the phosphagen energy system. The WAnT is a valid method of evaluating maximal short term anaerobic power of athletes, however the duration of the test in not sufficient to stress the glycolytic energy system. These results indicate that event specificity influences the metabolic specialism of athletes; exceptional anaerobic power is displayed in the 100m sample when compared to the 400m sample under identical laboratory conditions. The development of an athlete specific protocol is needed for use with an athletic population to adequately test the anaerobic capacity of the body.en_UK
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wales Institute Cardiffen
dc.titleUse of the Wingate test in comparing the anaerobic power and capacity of 100m and 400m sprint trained athletesen
dc.typeThesis


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