Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAlves, Patricia M.
dc.contributor.authorAl-Badi, Eide
dc.contributor.authorWithycombe, Cathryn
dc.contributor.authorJones, Paul M.
dc.contributor.authorPurdy, Kevin J.
dc.contributor.authorMaddocks, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T10:28:52Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T10:28:52Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-12
dc.identifier.citationAlves, P.M., Al-Badi, E., Withycombe, C., Jones, P.M., Purdy, K.J. and Maddocks, S.E. (2018) 'Interaction between Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is beneficial for colonisation and pathogenicity in a mixed-biofilm', Pathogens and Disease. https://doi.org/10.1093/femspd/fty003en_US
dc.identifier.issn2049-632X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/9244
dc.descriptionThis article was published in Pathogens and Disease on 12 January 2018 (online), available at https://doi.org/10.1093/femspd/fty003en_US
dc.description.abstractDebate regarding the co-existence of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in wounds remains contentious, with the dominant hypothesis describing a situation akin to niche partitioning, whereby both microorganisms are present but occupy distinct regions of the wound without interacting. In contrast, we hypothesised that these microorganisms do interact during early co-colonisation in a manner beneficial to both bacteria. We assessed competitive interaction between S. aureus and P. aeruginosa in biofilm cultured for 24-72 h and bacterial aggregates analogous to those observed in early (<24h) biofilm formation, and interaction with human keratinocytes. We observed that S. aureus predominated in biofilm and non-attached bacterial aggregates, acting as a pioneer for the attachment of P. aeruginosa. We report for the first time that S. aureus mediates a significant (P<0.05) increase in the attachment of P. aeruginosa to human keratinocytes, and that P. aeruginosa promotes an invasive phenotype in S. aureus. We show that co-infected keratinocytes exhibit an intermediate inflammatory response concurrent with impaired wound closure that is in keeping with a sustained pro-inflammatory response which allows for persistent microbial colonisation. These studies demonstrate that, contrary to the dominant hypothesis, interactions between S. aureus and P. aeruginosa may be an important factor for both colonisation and pathogenicity in the chronic infected wound.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPathogens and Disease;
dc.subjectpolymicrobial, wound-infection, biofilm, aggregation, invasion, adhesionen_US
dc.titleInteraction between Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is beneficial for colonisation and pathogenicity in a mixed-biofilmen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1093/femspd/fty003
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-01-09
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/under-embargo-all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-01-12
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2019-01-12
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following collection(s)

Show simple item record