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dc.contributor.authorFluck, Daniela
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Laura
dc.contributor.authorNiroula, Shailesh
dc.contributor.authorTallon, Christine
dc.contributor.authorSherpa, Kami T.
dc.contributor.authorStembridge, Mike
dc.contributor.authorAinslie, Philip
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, Ali
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-23T15:58:50Z
dc.date.available2018-02-23T15:58:50Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-01
dc.identifier.citationFlück, D., Morris, L.E., Niroula, S., Tallon, C.M., Sherpa, K.T., Stembridge, M., Ainslie, P.N. and McManus, A.M., 2017. UBC-Nepal expedition: markedly lower cerebral blood flow in high-altitude Sherpa children compared with children residing at sea level. Journal of Applied Physiology, 123(4), pp.1003-1010.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1522-1601
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/9299
dc.descriptionThis article was published in Journal of Applied Physiology on 1 October 2017, available at https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00292.2017en_US
dc.description.abstractDevelopmental cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to chronic high-altitude exposure, such as in the Sherpa population, are largely unknown. To examine hemodynamic adaptations in the developing human brain, we assessed common carotid (CCA), internal carotid (ICA), and vertebral artery (VA) flow and middle cerebral artery (MCA) velocity in 25 (9.6 ± 1.0 yr old, 129 ± 9 cm, 27 ± 8 kg, 14 girls) Sherpa children (3,800 m, Nepal) and 25 (9.9 ± 0.7 yr old, 143 ± 7 cm, 34 ± 6 kg, 14 girls) age-matched sea level children (344 m, Canada) during supine rest. Resting gas exchange, blood pressure, oxygen saturation and heart rate were assessed. Despite comparable age, height and weight were lower (both P < 0.01) in Sherpa compared with sea level children. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and ventilation were similar, whereas oxygen saturation (95 ± 2 vs. 99 ± 1%, P < 0.01) and end-tidal Pco2 (24 ± 3 vs. 36 ± 3 Torr, P < 0.01) were lower in Sherpa children. Global cerebral blood flow was ∼30% lower in Sherpa compared with sea level children. This was reflected in a lower ICA flow (283 ± 108 vs. 333 ± 56 ml/min, P = 0.05), VA flow (78 ± 26 vs. 118 ± 35 ml/min, P < 0.05), and MCA velocity (72 ± 14 vs. 88 ± 14 cm/s, P < 0.01). CCA flow was similar between Sherpa and sea level children (425 ± 92 vs. 441 ± 81 ml/min, P = 0.52). Scaling flow and oxygen uptake for differences in vessel diameter and body size, respectively, led to the same findings. A lower cerebral blood flow in Sherpa children may reflect specific cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to chronic hypoxia.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Societyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Applied Physiology;
dc.subjectbrain blood flowen_US
dc.subjecthigh altitudeen_US
dc.subjectpreadolescentsen_US
dc.subjecthypoxiaen_US
dc.titleUBC-Nepal expedition: markedly lower cerebral blood flow in high-altitude Sherpa children compared with children residing at sea levelen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00292.2017
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-05-30
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/under-embargo-all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-10-01
dc.refexceptionThere was a delay in securing the final peer-reviewed text
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2018-10-01
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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