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dc.contributor.authorMeyers, Rob
dc.contributor.authorOliver, Jon
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Michael G.
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Rhodri S.
dc.contributor.authorCronin, John
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-07T09:39:47Z
dc.date.available2018-03-07T09:39:47Z
dc.date.issued2017-04
dc.identifier.citationMeyers, R., Oliver, J.L., Hughes, M.G., Lloyd, R.S. and Cronin, J.B. (2017) 'Influence of Age, Maturity, and Body Size on the Spatiotemporal Determinants of Maximal Sprint Speed in Boys', 31(4), pp.1009-1016en_US
dc.identifier.issn1064-8011
dc.identifier.issn1533-4287 (online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/9330
dc.descriptionThis article was published in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research in April 2017, available at https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001310en_US
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to investigate the influence of age, maturity, and body size on the spatiotemporal determinants of maximal sprint speed in boys. Three-hundred and seventy-five boys (age: 13.0 ± 1.3 years) completed a 30-m sprint test, during which maximal speed, step length, step frequency, contact time, and flight time were recorded using an optical measurement system. Body mass, height, leg length, and a maturity offset represented somatic variables. Step frequency accounted for the highest proportion of variance in speed (∼58%) in the pre–peak height velocity (pre-PHV) group, whereas step length explained the majority of the variance in speed (∼54%) in the post-PHV group. In the pre-PHV group, mass was negatively related to speed, step length, step frequency, and contact time; however, measures of stature had a positive influence on speed and step length yet a negative influence on step frequency. Speed and step length were also negatively influence by mass in the post-PHV group, whereas leg length continued to positively influence step length. The results highlighted that pre-PHV boys may be deemed step frequency reliant, whereas those post-PHV boys may be marginally step length reliant. Furthermore, the negative influence of body mass, both pre-PHV and post-PHV, suggests that training to optimize sprint performance in youth should include methods such as plyometric and strength training, where a high neuromuscular focus and the development force production relative to body weight are key foci.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWolters Kluweren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research;
dc.subjectageen_US
dc.subjectmaturityen_US
dc.subjectbody sizeen_US
dc.subjectSpatiotemporal Determinanten_US
dc.subjectMaximal Sprint Speeden_US
dc.titleThe influence of age, maturity and body size on the spatiotemporal determinants of maximal sprint speed in boysen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001310
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-11-27
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-03-07
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2018-04-01


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