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dc.contributor.authorAbdelhakim, Ayman
dc.contributor.authorJones, Eleri
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorGriffith, Christopher J.
dc.contributor.authorHewedi, Mahmoud
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-15T08:11:30Z
dc.date.available2018-08-15T08:11:30Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-01
dc.identifier.citationAbdelhakim, A.S., Jones, E., Redmond, E.C., Griffith, C.J. and Hewedi, M. (2018) 'Evaluating cabin crew food safety training using the Kirkpatrick model: an airlines’ perspective', British Food Journal, 120(7), pp.1574-1589en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/9900
dc.descriptionArticle published in British Food Journal on 01 July 2018 available at https://doi.org/10.1108/BFJ-07-2017-0395en_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the evaluation of cabin crew food safety training using the Kirkpatrick model. Design/methodology/approach - Using a snowballing technique, 26 cabin crew, managers, supervisors and trainers participated in in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Summative content analysis was used to evaluate the data. Findings - In total, 26 respondents from 20 international airlines participated in the study. All respondents agreed that evaluating cabin crew food safety/hygiene issues is important in relation to in-flight food handling; for example, “Training evaluation helps in the improvement of the future training”; “We have an end of course feedback form, either done electronically or on paper and that looks at how the delegates felt the training went, if they came away learning something new, if the environment for learning was right, all sorts of things; the questionnaire is quite comprehensive”; and “Every trainee is given a feedback form to complete”. However, significant failures in food safety training and its evaluation were identified. Research limitations/implications - The evaluation of cabin crew food safety training shows that it is ineffective in some aspects, including learning achieved and behavioural change, and these can directly impact on the implementation of food safety practices. Evaluation failures may be due to the lack of available time in relation to other cabin crew roles. Further research may consider using a larger sample size, evaluating training effectiveness using social cognition models and assessments of airline and cabin crew food safety culture. Originality/value - This is the first study that evaluates cabin crew food safety training using the Kirkpatrick model. The findings provide an understanding of the current evaluation of cabin crew food safety training and can be used by airlines for improving and developing effective future food safety training programmes. This, in turn, may reduce the risk of passenger and crew foodborne disease.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherEmeralden_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBritish Food Journal;
dc.titleEvaluating cabin crew food safety training using the Kirkpatrick model: an airlines’ perspectiveen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1108/BFJ-07-2017-0395
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-12-11
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-08-15
dc.refexceptionThere was a delay in securing the final peer-reviewed text


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