Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Evie
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-05T07:58:42Z
dc.date.available2018-09-05T07:58:42Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/9987
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the predictive role of resilience in the subjective well-being of university students. A multiple regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between resilience, as measured by the Brief Resilience Scale (BRS), and the three main components of subjective well-being, as measured by the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (OHQ), the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) and the Positive (PA) and Negative (NA) Affect Schedule (PANAS). Previous research has shown that several cognitive and affective associated with increased subjective well-being correlate with the resources of resilience. 30 self-selecting university students aged 18-25 completed the study online via the survey host Qualtrics. It was predicted that the BRS would overall positively correlate with the OHQ, SWLS and the PA subscale of the PANAS, and would negatively correlate with the NA subscale of the PANAS. The results indicated that Positive Affect (PA) was the only component of subjective well-being to positively predict scores of the BRS. It is suggested that positive affect has a significant mediating role to play in the relationship between resilience and subjective-well- being, and may be a key element in understanding the improved health outcomes associated with resilience. The results also support the use of positive psychological interventions for building resilience to acute stressors in students.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleResilience and Subjective Well-Being among University Studentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-05-01
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following collection(s)

Show simple item record